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Three resolutions to stick to in 2016

In the wake of festive decadence and indulgences, the New Year gives us chance to plan and prepare what we want to achieve over the next twelve months. Whether it is to lose the Christmas chub, save more money or to kick a bad habit, the New Year gives us a great clean canvas to start out on.

Statistically, 30% of us will have already failed our New Year’s resolutions by this point in the year. A fairly miserable number I’m sure you will agree, however do not fret. Many resolutions we make can bare relevance across the different ways in which we engage with the world. Therefore we have listed our top resolutions and the ways in which we can use them to promote better practice and improve your exhibiting in 2016 (even if the gym membership is now already seeming like a silly idea):

 

Make this year count

When viewing upcoming shows, closely consider your short term marketing goals. Maybe you wish to raise brand awareness, or you have a new product range launching that you want to push? Then consider the audience that you want to engage with and the kind of shows that they will be attending. All these factors are hugely important in the success of your event and pivotal to your ROI.

Save money

Budgeting and frugality is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions amongst people, and there is no reason this should be any different when it comes to exhibitions and events. It is important to consider the reasons behind exhibiting before every show. Exhibiting just because your competitors do, or because you have done for the past five years can often be detrimental both to your finances and your brand among potential clients.

Break old habits

A survey by Marketing Week stated that 80% of leads are not followed up. Failing to follow up on leads generated at shows or the employment of ineffective follow up methods has long been a sin of event marketers. Similar to making a purchase and then leaving the shop without your goods, a poor follow up can leave you empty-handed after shelling out on valuable exhibition space.